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LAKE LEVEL May 30, 2011

Posted by thenaturalist in Floods/High Water, Rain, Records.
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As of Sunday, May 29, 2011, Lake Champlain has been at or above the highest level recorded in the last 184 years for all but a few days over the past month. It peaked several weeks ago at a record 103.3 feet. (Free Press Staff Report, “Heavy rains add to lake flooding,” Burlington Free Press, May 30, 2011)

RAIN IN MAY May 28, 2011

Posted by thenaturalist in Floods/High Water, Rain, Records.
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The big storm May 26-27, 2011 made the wettest spring on record even wetter. 18.14 inches of rain fell at the National Weather Service office in South Burlington between March 1 and midnight May 26. The old spring record was 15.46 inches in 1983.

By midnight May 26,  6.87 inches had fallen making it the second wettest May on record, with five days still to go. The wettest May was 7.10 inches in 2006. (Matt Sutkoski and Nancy Remsen, ” ‘Saturated state’ seeks disaster relief,” Burlington Free Press, May 28, 2011)

WETTEST SPRING ON RECORD May 17, 2011

Posted by thenaturalist in Floods/High Water, Rain, Records.
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The rains that started back in on May 14, 2011 and continued May 15 and 16 brought Lake Champlain back up to 102.35 inches by the afternoon of May 16, and the water was still rising slowly. The National Weather Service says this spring is now the wettest on record in Burlington. As of 4:30 p.m. May 16, total rainfall for Burlington had reached 15.49 inches. That’s only slightly above the previous record of 15.46 inches that fell in 1983, but it’s still raining…. (Matt Sutkowski, “Rains prolong flood agony,” Burlington Free Press, May 17, 2011)

AND NOW IT’S RAINING AGAIN May 16, 2011

Posted by thenaturalist in Floods/High Water, Rain, Records.
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Burlington is now on track to having its wettest spring on record. Climatologists consider spring the period from March 1 through May 31. As of 4:30 p.m. Sunday (May 15, 2011), 14.82 inches of rain had fallen on the city, less than an inch shy of the record of 15.46 inches that fell in 1983. Lake Champlain, meanwhile, remained only 102.16 feet above sea level — about a foot lower than the record set earlier this month, but still more than two feet above flood stage. (Matt Ryan, “Rain adds to flood woes,” BFP, May 16, 2011)

THE RISE AND FALL OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN May 10, 2011

Posted by thenaturalist in Floods/High Water, Rain, Records.
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According to the Lake Champlain Basin Program, the Lake Champlain watershed covers 8,234 square miles, including most of the western half of Vermont and eastern Adirondacks and parts of southern Quebec. The lake covers about 435 square miles and holds roughly 6.8 trillion gallons of water. The highest level previously recorded in Burlington was 101.86 feet on April 27, 1993.

On March 9, 2011, the lake level was just 96.48 feet above sea level. It took nearly two months of heavy rain and snowmelt before the flood peaked at just over 103.2 feet on Friday May 6, 2011. Now that the rain has stopped, and the snow has melted, it will take a similar length of time for the lake to recede. It has only one outlet, the Richelieu River, which runs north toward Montreal. At 8 a.m. May 7, the lake level had dropped to 103.18, and by 8 p.m. it was down to 103.15. At 8 a.m. May 8, it was down to 103.11 and at 8 p.m. down to 103.05. At 8 a.m. May 9 it was down to 103.00 and at 8 p.m. down to 102.9. (Matt Sutkoski, “One way out for lake water,” BFP, May 10, 2011.

APRIL RAIN RECORD BROKEN May 1, 2011

Posted by thenaturalist in Floods/High Water, Rain, Records.
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As of Friday (April 30, 2011), 7.88 inches of rain had fallen on Burlington, 5.10 inches more than normal and more than an inch above the 1983 record for the month of April, which was 6.55 inches. No rain was expected for Saturday (April 31, 2011) and 7.88 inches is likely to be the final tally for the month. (Molly Walsh, “Flood warnings persist,” BFP, May 1, 2011)

APRIL 26-27, 2011 RAIN April 27, 2011

Posted by thenaturalist in Rain, Records.
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Does the 2.74 inches of rain that fell April 26 and 27, 2011 represent a 10-year storm or a 100-year storm? (question posed by Joel Banner Baird of the Burlington Free Press)

ANOTHER LATE SNOW December 7, 2009

Posted by thenaturalist in Late Snows, Records, Snow.
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2009’s first measurable snowfall has tied with 1937 for the latest snow on record at the National Weather Service offices in South Burlington. So the list is now topped by December 7, 1937 and December 7, 2009. (BFP, 12/9/09)

LATE SNOWS IN BURLINGTON November 28, 2009

Posted by thenaturalist in Records, Snow.
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On average, the first measurable snow hits Burlington around November 6. Meteorologists at the National Weather Service have compiled a list of years with late first snows. Most of those years, but not all of them, went on to have below average snow for the season. Normal snowfall is about 80 inches. Here’s the list from Matt Sutkoski’s blog, BFP, 11/28/09):

FIRST SNOW          (SEASON TOTAL)

  • Dec 07, 1937   (45.1 inches)
  • Dec 05, 1915   (54.4 inches)
  • Dec 01, 1948   (40.7 inches)
  • Nov 30, 1918   (69.6 inches)
  • Nov 30, 1953   (83.6 inches)
  • Nov 30, 1960   (51.6 inches)
  • Nov 28, 1913   (56.5 inches)
  • Nov 27, 1941   (57.7 inches)
  • Nov 26, 1982   (80.5 inches)
  • Nov 25, 1957   (94.9 inches)

BURLINGTON SUMMER September 1, 2009

Posted by thenaturalist in Cold Weather, Rain, Records.
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The National Weather Service in South Burlington defines summer, meteorologically, as June, July, and August. Burlington’s coldest summer was 1912, when the mean temperature for June, July, and August was 63.5 degrees. The wettest summer was 1998, when two feet of rain fell in Burlington between June 1 and August 31. (Matt Sutkoski, BFP, 9/1/09)

NEW VERMONT WEATHER RECORDS FOR JANUARY 6 January 7, 2007

Posted by thenaturalist in Records.
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According to Maureen Breitback at the National Weather Service in South Burlington, January 6, 2007 broke several warm-weather records:

65 degrees in Montpelier beat old record of 46 degrees in 1949

62 degrees in Burlington beat old record of 56 degrees in 1890

61 degrees in St. Johnsbury beat old record of 50 degrees in 1946

47 degrees on Mount Mansfield beat old record of 41 degrees in 1998

(BFP, 1/7/07)

NOVEMBER 2006 WEATHER RECORDS December 1, 2006

Posted by thenaturalist in Records.
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All day yesterday people were talking about the possibility that this warm November might set a new record for the WARMEST NOVEMBER in Vermont’s weather history. We just missed. First place is still held by November 1948, which averaged 44.4 degrees. November 2006 came in second with an average of 42.9 degrees. But it did set other records. It tied with 1915, 1937, and 1948 as the LEAST SNOWY NOVEMBER (only a trace all of those years) and also the LEAST SNOWY NOVEMBER ATOP MT. MANSFIELD (0.5 inches). It also scored two RECORD HIGHS FOR NOVEMBER DATES: November 17 was 70 degrees, exceeding 65 degrees in 1891, and November 30 was 63 degrees, exceeding 60 degrees in 1991. (BFP 12/1/06)

HEAT WAVE OF SEPTEMBER 2002 September 10, 2002

Posted by thenaturalist in Heat Waves, Records.
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Burlington’s scorching September continued on September 10 as the temperature soared to 93 degrees, topping the old record high of 90 degrees for September 10 set in 1989. This week’s weather is now an official heat wave, which requires three consecutive days at or above 90 degrees. this heat wave is the third of the year, with the first in early July and the second in mid-August. There have been 17 days at or above 90. The average is six.

WINTER 2001-2002 March 1, 2002

Posted by thenaturalist in Records, Winter.
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The winter of 2001-2002 was the first in Vermont’s recorded weather history in which the temperature did not fall below zero.

SNOW RECORDS October 9, 2001

Posted by thenaturalist in Records, Snow.
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Trace September 20, 1991

Earliest 1 inch of snow October 9, 1979

Earliest 3 inches of snow October 10, 1925

Earliest 6 inches of snow November 1, 1993*

Earliest 12 inches of snow November 16, 1906 *

*6- and 12-inch snows don’t occur every winter

(BFP, 10/19/01)

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