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LATE SNOWS IN BURLINGTON November 28, 2009

Posted by thenaturalist in Records, Snow.
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On average, the first measurable snow hits Burlington around November 6. Meteorologists at the National Weather Service have compiled a list of years with late first snows. Most of those years, but not all of them, went on to have below average snow for the season. Normal snowfall is about 80 inches. Here’s the list from Matt Sutkoski’s blog, BFP, 11/28/09):

FIRST SNOW          (SEASON TOTAL)

  • Dec 07, 1937   (45.1 inches)
  • Dec 05, 1915   (54.4 inches)
  • Dec 01, 1948   (40.7 inches)
  • Nov 30, 1918   (69.6 inches)
  • Nov 30, 1953   (83.6 inches)
  • Nov 30, 1960   (51.6 inches)
  • Nov 28, 1913   (56.5 inches)
  • Nov 27, 1941   (57.7 inches)
  • Nov 26, 1982   (80.5 inches)
  • Nov 25, 1957   (94.9 inches)
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Comments»

1. Jay - November 8, 2010

Was searching for weather conditions for Dec. 7, 1941 for northeastern Vermont and found this entry. Closest I’ve come on the Net yet. So a late snow and relatively “light” on November 27. Where can I find more information on how snowy it might have gotten, or not, by the afternoon of December 7, say, around three in the afternoon …

thenaturalist - November 8, 2010

Interesting question. Try the National Weather Service office at the Burlington Airport. They have all kinds of weather data, and might have historic data stored somewhere or might know where else to look. Here’s their Web site: http://www.erh.noaa.gov/er/btv/ You might also want to try the Fairbanks Museum. They keep a lot of weather records too, and since they’re up in the northeastern Vermont, they might have the kind of information you’re looking for: http://www.fairbanksmuseum.org/ Good luck!

Jay - November 9, 2010

Thanks for the reply and for the leads!


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